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19 Reasons Latin Americans Come To The U.S. That Have Nothing To Do With The American Dream

diasporadash:

Important

Source: diasporadash
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Confessions of an #AmbitiousBlackFeminist
April 22, 2014

Calendar has been full of teaching, speaking, listening, reading, writing, sharing, securing, releasing and loving…

And there’s more coming up. 

Sunshine and laughter,
Reza Rites / Venus Sings / DJ Reza Wreckage

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radicalqueerbrownboy:

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

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Fucking Christ! This.., I’m livid!

(via browngurlwfro)

Source: anarcho-queer
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blackgirlsrpretty2:

younggiftedafricanqueen:

blankbabe:

we are the last generation whose baby photos weren’t taken on phones

true 

:(

Source: blankbabe
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ode-to-the-world:

La Mulâtresse Solitude (1772-19 November 1802), was a slave rebel and heroine of the fight against slavery in Guadeloupe.

Originally a slave, she was freed by the abolition of slavery in 1794 during the French revolution. When slavery was reintroduced on Guadeloupe by Napoleon in 1802, she joined Louis Delgrès call to fight for her freedom and took part in the Battle of the 18 May 1802.

She was captured and executed by hanging after being granted to wait out her pregnancy.

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(via neoafrican)

Source: ode-to-the-world
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dianarossweave:

odinsblog:

Five Myths About Crime in Black America—and the Statistical Truths

In the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death [and Renisha McBride and Jonathan Ferrell], we’ve seen a lot of discussion of the larger societal issues that play into how and when people are perceived as criminals. There were hoodies, there were marches, and there were frank talks from parent to child about how to minimize the danger of being a young person of color. On the other side, there were justifications of George Zimmerman’s actions: a smear campaign against Martin’s character, and plenty of writers explaining that statistically, blacks are simply more dangerous to be around.

That framing ignores the realities behind the numbers. Here are five myths about crime and people of color.

Shani O. Hilton

BEEN LOOKIN FOR THIS

(via wocinsolidarity)

Source: colorlines.com
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So yeahhhhjjj, I’m somewhere in between feeling like I can rest/relax after last night’s #musicmovesreza event and asking myself, “what do u mean relax?! Have u looked at your calendar - or folder of flyers for upcoming events?!”

In essence: Hmmmm. Argghhhh. Zzzzzzzz.

Confessions of an #AmbitiousBlackFeminist

Photo Set

Super behind on sending out a Take 5 with Reza Rites Newsletter, but these are some things going on and coming up in my world. I hope to see friends this Wed April 16 at my #musicmovesreza exhibit at JWU or on Saturday, April 19 at the diversity conference at RIC.

I’ll have copies of 3 AM is the New Black at each of these events and I have a variety of mini displays and Music Moves pop up art shows coming up too!

Follow along on VenusSings.com, and AmbitiousBlackFeminist.com and on social media: @rezaclif, @3amblack, #3amblack, #musicmovesreza.

Sunshine and laughter,
Reza Rites, #AmbitiousBlackFeminist

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jadapoo:

Don’t be fooled by curly hair!

(via naturalblkgirlsrock)

Source: jadapoo
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"So three Black women in maybe two thousand pages of women’s magazines and all of them biracial or racially ambiguous, so they could be Indian or Puerto Rican or something. Not one of them is dark. Not one of them looks like me, so I can’t get clues for makeup from these magazines. Look, this article tells you to pinch your cheeks for color because all their readers are supposed to have cheeks you can pinch for color. This tells you about different hair products for everyone—and everyone means blondes, brunettes, and redheads. I am none of those. And this tells you about the best conditioners—for straight, wavy and curly. No kinky. See what they mean by curly? My hair could never do that. This tells you about matching your eye color and eye shadow—blue, green, and hazel eyes. But my eyes are black so I can’t know what shadow works for me. This says that this pink lipstick is universal, but they mean universal if you are white because I would look like a golliwog if I tried that shade of pink. Oh look, here is some progress. An advertisement for foundation. There are seven different shades for white skin and one generic chocolate shade, but that is progress. Now let’s talk about what is racially skewed. Do you see why a magazine like Essence exists?"

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An excerpt from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Americanah (2013)

I cannot wait to buy this book. 

(via il-tenore-regina)

(via newwavefeminism)

Source: bxtchplease